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Typing Incriminating Evidence in the Memo Field

A recent news article has highlighted the importance of being careful when typing memo fields. The manager of the Harvard Med School morgue was accused of stealing and selling human body parts. Cedric Lodge and his wife Denise were among a half-dozen people arrested for some pretty grotesque crimes. During the investigation, it was discovered that one of the payments made to Denise Lodge for human remains included the memo “head number 7.” Another payment for $200 read “braiiiiiins.” This serves as a cautionary tale for anyone who thinks they won’t get caught.

It’s easy to think that you won’t get caught when committing a crime. However, the memo field can be a silent witness to your actions. In many cases, it can be used as evidence against you. This is especially true when committing financial crimes, such as embezzlement or money laundering. The memo field can reveal the purpose of a payment and provide a paper trail for investigators to follow.

In addition to financial crimes, memo fields can also be used to incriminate individuals in other types of crimes. For example, a memo field on a check or wire transfer could potentially reveal the purchase of illegal drugs or weapons. It’s important to remember that anything you write in the memo field is recorded and could be used against you in court.

To avoid incriminating yourself, it’s best to keep the memo field blank or only use it for legitimate purposes. If you need to reference a specific transaction, use a code or reference number instead of a potentially incriminating phrase. It’s also important to remember that electronic transactions, such as wire transfers or online payments, can leave a digital trail that is much harder to erase than a paper memo.

In conclusion, the recent news article about the Harvard Med School morgue manager serves as a reminder to be careful when typing memo fields. The memo field can be a silent witness to your actions and could potentially incriminate you in a crime. To avoid this, it’s best to keep the memo field blank or only use it for legitimate purposes. Remember that anything you write in the memo field is recorded and could be used against you in court.

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